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Tiny creature - the blue bat

SFr. 68.00

A home isn't a home without the little useless objects lying around. Don't understand mess and find excuses for yourself; it's about art and decor. Surround yourself with this lovely little creature.
It's hand sculpted, hand painted and unique. Adopt it today.

Min Pin believes in compassionate design, quality artistry, sustainability, and fun!
Currently based in Melbourne Australia, all Min Pin pieces are developed and handmade by Penny Min Ferguson in her studio in the Dandenong Ranges.


 5 x 6 x 7cm

 

Pauline tells you a Nigerian story:

According to a particular East Nigerian tale, the bat developed its nocturnal habits after causing the death of his partner, the bush-rat...
The bat and the bush-rat would share activities, such as rummaging through the grass and trees, hunting, talking and bonding during the day. When at night, the bat and the bush-rat would alternate in cooking duties, cooking what was caught, and eat together. It appeared to be a dedicated partnership, but the bat hated the bush-rat immensely. The bush-rat always found the bat's soup more appetizing, so when eating dinner one night, asked the bat why the soup tasted better than his own and also asked how it was made. The bat agreed to show him how to make it the next day, but instead was forming a malicious plan.  Next day, as the bat prepared his soup, the bush-rat came, greeting him and asking if he could be shown what was agreed yesterday. Earlier, the bat had found a pot looking exactly like the one he used usually, but it held warm water and so decided to use this instead. The bat explained to the bush-rat that to make his soup, he had to boil himself before serving the soup, where sweetness and flavor of the soup came from the flesh. The bat jumped in the pot seemingly excited, with the bush-rat mesmerized. After a few minutes, the bat climbed out and while the bush-rat was distracted, switched pots. The bat then served his soup out of the soup pot; both tasted it. Overanxious and eager, the bush-rat jumped into the pot of warm water. He stayed much longer in the pot, dying in the process.  When the bush-rat's wife returned that night to find her husband dead, she wept and ran to the chief of the land's house, telling him about what had happened and what she was sure the bat had done. In hearing this, the chief became angry, ordering for the immediate arrest of the bat. It just so happened that the bat was flying over the house and overheard what was just said. He quickly went into hiding high up in a tree. When the chief's men went looking for the bat, he could not be found. The search to arrest the bat carried on over several days, but he still could not be found. The bat needed to eat, so he flew out of hiding every night to hunt for food to avoid being arrested. This, according to Eastern Nigeria mythology, is why bats only fly at night.