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Tiny creature - The Roaring Shark

SFr. 68.00

A home isn't a home without the little useless objects lying around. Don't understand mess and find excuses for yourself; it's about art and decor. Surround yourself with this lovely little creature.
It's hand sculpted, hand painted and unique. Adopt it today.

Min Pin believes in compassionate design, quality artistry, sustainability, and fun!
Currently based in Melbourne Australia, all Min Pin pieces are developed and handmade by Penny Min Ferguson in her studio in the Dandenong Ranges.


 6 x 10 x 9cm

Pauline tells you a story:

Jaws, the most famous movie about Sharks, directed by Steven Spielberg, almost never succeeded.
The film had a troubled shoot and went far over budget. David Brown said that the budget "was $4 million and the picture wound up costing $9 million"; the effects outlays alone grew to $3 million due to the problems with the mechanical sharks. Disgruntled crew members gave the film the nickname "Flaws". Spielberg attributed many problems to his perfectionism and his inexperience. The former was epitomized by his insistence on shooting at sea with a life-sized shark; "I could have shot the movie in the tank or even in a protected lake somewhere, but it would not have looked the same,". As for his lack of experience: "I was naive about the ocean, basically. I was pretty naive about mother nature and the hubris of a filmmaker who thinks he can conquer the elements was foolhardy, but I was too young to know I was being foolhardy when I demanded that we shoot the film in the Atlantic Ocean.
Gottlieb said that "there was nothing to do except make the movie", so everyone kept overworking.
Spielberg later calculated that during the 12-hour daily work schedule, on average only four hours were actually spent filming. A kind of curse was also over their heads, as Gottlieb was nearly decapitated by the boat's propellers, and Dreyfuss almost imprisoned in the steel cage.

Nevertheless, the delays proved beneficial in some regards. The script was refined during production, and the unreliable mechanical sharks forced Spielberg to shoot many scenes so that the shark was only hinted at. For example, for much of the shark hunt, its location is indicated by the floating yellow barrels. The opening had the shark devouring Chrissie, but it was rewritten so that it would be shot with Backlinie being dragged and yanked by cables to simulate an attack. Spielberg also included multiple shots of just the dorsal fin. This forced restraint is widely thought to have added to the film's suspense. As Spielberg put it years later, "The film went from a Japanese Saturday matinee horror flick to more of a Hitchcock, the less-you-see-the-more-you-get thriller." In another interview, he similarly declared, "The shark not working was a godsend. It made me become more like Alfred Hitchcock than like Ray Harryhausen." The acting became crucial for making audiences believe in such a big shark: "The more fake the shark looked in the water, the more my anxiety told me to heighten the naturalism of the performances."